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start [2019/10/16 17:33]
2898
start [2019/10/16 21:40] (current)
zack [Welcome to the Agent PSIG wiki]
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-{{:​agent-psig-logo.png?​150|}} ====== Welcome to the Agent PSIG wiki ======+{{:​agent-psig-logo.png?​150|}} 
 + ====== Welcome to the Agent PSIG wiki ======
  
  
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 Zack Hashemi\\ Zack Hashemi\\
-Macefusion\\+MACE\\
 agent-chair@omg.org\\ agent-chair@omg.org\\
 \\ \\
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  In general, agents can be software agents, hardware agents, firmware agents, robotic agents, human agents, and so on. While software developers naturally think of IT systems as being constructed of only software agents, a combination of agent mechanisms might in fact be used from shop-floor manufacturing to warfare systems.\\  In general, agents can be software agents, hardware agents, firmware agents, robotic agents, human agents, and so on. While software developers naturally think of IT systems as being constructed of only software agents, a combination of agent mechanisms might in fact be used from shop-floor manufacturing to warfare systems.\\
  
 +
 +**//Agents and AI//**\\
 +(to come)\\
  
 **//Basic Properties//​**\\ **//Basic Properties//​**\\
 The purpose of an Agent to specify a classification of autonomous entities (agent instances) that can adapt to and interact with their environment,​ and to specify the features, constraints,​ and semantics that characterize those agent instances. Agents deployed for IT systems generally should have the following three important properties: The purpose of an Agent to specify a classification of autonomous entities (agent instances) that can adapt to and interact with their environment,​ and to specify the features, constraints,​ and semantics that characterize those agent instances. Agents deployed for IT systems generally should have the following three important properties:
  
-• //​Autonomous//​ - is capable acting without direct external intervention. Agents have some degree of control over their internal state and can act based on their own experiences. They can also possess their own set of internal responsibilities and processing that enable them to act without any external choreography. As such, they can act in reactive and proactive ways. When an agent acts on behalf of (or as a proxy for) some person or thing, its autonomy is expected to embody the goals and policies of the entity that it represents. In UML terms, agents can have classifier behavior that governs the lifecycle of the agent.+• //​Autonomous//​ - is capable acting without direct external intervention. Agents have some degree of control over their internal state and can act based on their own experiences. They can also possess their own set of internal responsibilities and processing that enable them to act without any external choreography--which and range from very simple coding to very complex techniques). As such, they can act in reactive and proactive ways. When an agent acts on behalf of (or as a proxy for) some person or thing, its autonomy is expected to embody the goals and policies of the entity that it represents. In UML terms, agents can have classifier behavior that governs the lifecycle of the agent.
  
-• //​Interactive//​ - communicates with the environment and other agents. Agents are interactive entities because they are capable of exchanging rich forms of messages with other entities in their environment. These messages can support requests for services and other kinds of resources, as well as event detection and notification. They can be synchronous or asynchronous in nature. The interaction can also be conversational in nature, such as negotiating contracts, marketplace-style bidding, or simply making a query. In the Woodridge-Jennings definition of agency, this property is referred to as social ability.+• //​Interactive//​ - communicates with the environment and other agents. Agents are interactive entities because they are capable of exchanging rich forms of messages with other entities in their environment. These messages can support requests for services and other kinds of resources, as well as event detection and notification. They can be synchronous or asynchronous in nature. The interaction can also be conversational in nature, such as negotiating contracts, marketplace-style bidding, or simply making a query or message call to another object. In the Woodridge-Jennings definition of agency, this property is referred to as social ability.
  
 • //​Adaptive//​ - capable of responding to other agents and/or its environment. Agents can react to messages and events and then respond in a timely and appropriate manner. Agents can be designed to make difficult decisions and even modify their behavior based on their experiences. They can learn and evolve. In the Woodridge-Jennings definition of agency, this property is referred to as reactivity and proactivity.\\ • //​Adaptive//​ - capable of responding to other agents and/or its environment. Agents can react to messages and events and then respond in a timely and appropriate manner. Agents can be designed to make difficult decisions and even modify their behavior based on their experiences. They can learn and evolve. In the Woodridge-Jennings definition of agency, this property is referred to as reactivity and proactivity.\\
  
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-**//Agents and AI//**\\ 
-(to come)\\ 
  
 **//OMG Semantics//​**\\ **//OMG Semantics//​**\\
start.1571261637.txt.gz · Last modified: 2019/10/16 17:33 by 2898